About This Blog

 

Sherri Dorfman, CEO, Stepping Stone Partners, Connected & Digital Health Innovation Specialist

My blog is designed to spotlight healthcare organizations with innovative uses of technology & data to drive Care Coordination, Collaboration & Patient Engagement.

These new approaches may influence your product & service roadmap, experiences, partnerships and marketing strategies.

MY EXPERTISE:

While consulting, I leverage my extensive experience, knowledge and professional network to help companies make the right strategic product and marketing decisions. Services include:

> Strategic Planning Market Review: Competitive Assessments, Partnership Evaluations. Workshop facilitation. Insight drives product, partnership and marketing strategies

> Product Roadmap & Consumer Experience Planning: Conceptualizes, defines and validates solutions/experiences through Marketing Research and journey mapping.  Utilizes new innovative online and mobile research tools to co-create with target buyers and users, gathering input while understanding context to guide the development of personalized solutions & experiences.

> Strategic Product Marketing: Differentiated value proposition story incorporated into marketing & sales assets

Find out how I can help you. Call me at 508-655-6585. Email me at SDorfman@Stepping-Stone.net to set up an exploratory discussion.

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    Entries in patient generated health data (3)

    Voice Health Summit Spotlight 2018

    During the Voice.Health Summit in Boston last week, innovators gathered to explore opportunities, discuss issues and to experience different voice technology use cases.

    BCH John Brownstein shares voice health use casesJohn Brownstein, Chief Innovation Officer at Boston Children’s Hospital is excited about the opportunity for healthcare to lead other verticals with this empowering technology which many of us use every day – Alexa tell me… Siri what is… ?

    Since the year 2000, the health technology industry has evolved from websites (e.g. patient portals) to mobile applications (mhealth) and now to voice and conversational assistants. There are many use cases which help patients and providers in different settings.

    • In hospital, the doctor asks to see the patient’s latest lab results.
    • Following a hospital discharge, the patient interacts with his virtual robot to record side effects from his new medications.
    • Preparing for an outpatient visit, a patient verbally responds to the pre-visit questions to share with her doctor.
    • Days after a remote monitoring visit, a patient asks additional questions to help her manage her asthma.

    Although voice health technology is in the early adoption stage, health innovators are convinced that these virtual voice assistants can address real problems -- the shortage of healthcare professionals, clinician burn out, inefficiencies in patient care, lack of patient engagement and the inability to personally support patients along their health journey outside of the hospital. Nuance’s Peter Durlach stresses the importance of using these technologies to free up the clinicians to take care of patients.

    Voice has many unique benefits for healthcare. Dr. Rupal Patel, CEO VocalID describes the convenience (e.g. hands free), the capability to capture information and insights about the user (e.g. gender, size, bio- markers) and ability to generate trust through continuous listening and personalized responses. Other benefits include the ability to capture context (e.g. surroundings, urgency and intent) and empower the user (e.g. patient feels a sense of control). Amazon’s Emily Roberts, Sr. Marketing Manager adds the value of capturing “moments of the day” by incorporating voice into other devices (e.g. smart home/refrigerator, car).

    Voice Health in Action

    During the Voice.Health Summit, we saw what “voice-first” can deliver in five different care setting exhibits. Here are some interesting examples of use cases to bring value to patients and/or the care team.

    1. Hospital/Patient. With the Joint Commission’s focus on “accurate screening and assessment of pain”, Dr. Samir Tulebaev, Geriatrician and the Center of Nursing Excellence at Brigham and Women’s Hospital are working with Orbita’s CEO Nate Treloar on the development of a post- operative pain management voice assistant. The patient tells her bedside teddy bear Briggie (which has a built in microphone) that she is in pain, describes where the pain is and indicates if the pain is intolerable. Her nurse immediately receives a secure text message to respond.

    2. Hospital/Clinical. Cedars-Sinai uses Sopris Assistant to record, summarize, approve and place the patient care note into the EHR. The AI summons the listening technology, drives the summary and produces the intelligent note for physicians. Cedars-Sinai helped Sopris Health create an experience and workflow catered to hospitalist.

    3. Senior Living & Home Health. Caregivers can engage an aging patient with the AI powered LifePod virtual assistant which serves as a personalized companion, delivers reminders, and monitors daily activities. LifePod’s CEO Stuart Patterson emphasized the importance of “proactive voice” which shares and captures essential information without relying on the person to ask (i.e. reactive voice).  

    4. Consumer Home. Anne Weiler, CEO Wellpepper, the winner of the Alexa Diabetes Challenge, engages a patient who is recently diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes. She uses her voice to weigh herself, scan her feet for ulcers and track her care plan tasks. This voice assistant gives the patient an opportunity to proactively engage whenever she wants.

    5. Vocal Biomarker LabSonde Health is interested in capturing and using a patient’s voice samples as health measures for different physical (e.g. sinus congestion) and mental health conditions (e.g. depression, suicide risk). 

    Lessons from Voice Health Innovators

    As with any new technology, there is a lot to learn from the pioneers.

    Real Problem Definition: Sara Holoubek, CEO Luminary Labs emphasized the importance of deciding who (e.g. newly diagnosed) and what (e.g. help with self-management) as a first step to focus the development planning process.

    Patient/User Input: Deloitte's Debbie Hays, Specialist Executive discussed the patient journey research for the DeloitteASSIST voice solution which revealed the “challenges and delays” that needed to be addressed while the patient is in the hospital room.

    Patient/User Feedback: Karin Beckstrom, Sr. Product Manager ERT Innovation Lab (formally PHT) described using voice to capture patient reported outcomes (PROs) on a daily basis. We ask-- how engaging was it? Are you willing to answer questions on a daily basis? How difficult was the skill? Did Alexa understand you?  

    "Flu Doctor" from Seattle Children's Hospital Stacey UlaciaPersonalization: Stacey Ulacia, Sr. Communications Specialist at Seattle Children’s Hospital in partnership with Boston Children’s Hospital, developed the “Flu Doctor” voice skill. This brings more value since it is customized based on the zip code provided by the patient.

    Opportunities for Voice to Solve Healthcare Problems

    There are many use cases for voice technology to help drive the triple aim. 

    UPMC’s Dr. Shivdev Rao believes it would be valuable to use voice to help triage a care situation, and capture information from the patient pre or post exam.

    Boston Children’s Hospital Dr. Docktor shared Pediatrics Voice Hackathon examples including one which uses voice to help a patient prepare for his procedure at home with instructions and images that are tailored to his specific health issues (e.g. food problems).  

    Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles is collaborating with Sumeet Bhalitia, Founder & CEO Avia to bring voice into the hospital room, giving the patient control over their experience and the ability to get assistance as needed (e.g. bathroom help) with the goal of increased patient satisfaction.  

    Recent metrics for Answers by CignaCigna’s Laura Schuntermann, Global Head of Digital Strategy & Partnerships is excited by the growth of voice search. Gartner predicts by 2020, 30% of searches will be voice activated. Laura shared results from the voice solution Answers by Cigna which helps members get the information they need to make better health care decisions.

    Novartis’s Robert Stevens, Executive Director of Digital Strategy & Medical Innovation described voice health use cases that help clinicians determine the diagnosis/clinical decision support, check guidelines, send RXs to pharmacy and order follow up patient education.   

    Future Voice Health Considerations

    Although there is excitement around voice health, innovators are working to remove speed bumps to accelerate adoption:

    Addressing Privacy/Security. Several organizations are anxiously awaiting for HIPAA compliant voice devices. There is also a concern that the device is always listening, even without the “wake” word.  

    Educating Patients about Voice. A few presenters admitted that patients do not know what they can ask. This means that either they are not using all of the voice capabilities or the patient has an unexpected experience -- Alexa says …. Hmm I do not know that one.

    Mayo Clinic's Optimizing Voice Content Creating complete Patient Experiences. Mayo Clinic’s Jennifer Warner, Sr Editor Global Business Solutions explains that voice is additive and does not replace other consumer engagement methods. Therefore, it is important to provide an “omni-channel” experience to engage and support the patient through every touch point. 

    Collaborating on Care Design. Maia Ottenstein, Digital Experience Design at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital (DICE/design group within the hospital) is working on the “smart patient concierge” which empowers the patient to access assistance and resources on demand.

    It will take a community of patient and clinical stakeholders to define, design and deliver voice technologies that bring real value to the users. It is encouraging to see that these stakeholders are coming together in hospitals, accelerators and innovation hubs to bring these voice technologies to life.  

    Virtua Navigates Orthopedic Patients Pre- & Post-Surgery with Improved Patient Engagement and Care Coordination

    WELLBE PLATFORM FOR PATIENT ENGAGEMENTWith an aging population and increase in chronic conditions including obesity, the demand for hip and knee operation is increasing dramatically. A study in the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery estimates by 2030 “demand for total hip arthroplasties to grow by 174% to 572,000 and demand for primary total knee arthroplasties by 673% to 3.48 million procedures”.

    Responding to this strong demand and high procedure expense, CMS launched the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) payment bundle April 1st, focusing on cost and quality over a 90-day period beginning with the hospital admission. The CMS CJR Payment bundle is initially for about 800 selected hospitals across the country. 

    Although Virtua, one of New Jersey’s largest health systems with hospitals, surgical and rehabilitation centers, is voluntarily participating in the BPCI payment bundle, their investment in the orthopedic patient experience at their Joint Replacement Institute (JRI) started long before the payment model changes. 

    Virtua Health’s Orthopedic Patient Care Journey 

    Back in 2000, Virtua adopted the Six Sigma methodology and launched the STAR initiative to deliver an "outstanding patient experience”.

    “When we look at how we can change and improve a process, we focus on the patient and understand what they need, not what we think they need,” explains Kate Gillespie, AVP of Virtua’s Orthopedic Service Line. 

    With a commitment to enhancing the orthopedic (hip, knee) surgery experience, Virtua listened to patients discuss their challenges and needs. Through focus group research (Spring 2015), Virtua learned:
    • Orthopedic patients need a lot of information to get ready for their surgery but are overwhelmed when inundated with too much at one time.
    • Patients place a high value on their doctor’s suggestions to achieve best results.
    • Patients that are prepared are more confident and will participate in the process leading to improved outcomes.
      
    “We learned that as patients prepared for surgery, they were asked many of the same questions by different members of our care team,” said Gillespie. “We needed to improve the patient experience and ensure the consistency of information shared along the patient journey. We also wanted to engage the family to support the patient before and after surgery and decided to require that each patient has a ‘care partner’.” 

    The Virtua JRI team looked for technology to continuously engage patients and families, from on-boarding before surgery, to educating and guiding them from discharge through recovery.  The tool needed to be actionable, collecting essential information from the patient (i.e. concerns, pain levels) and informing Nurse Navigators when patients fall off track.

    Virtua JRI chose to implement a Connected CarePath for Total Joint Replacement from Wellbe, a solution provider in Madison, Wisconsin. Working closely with Wellbe, Virtua customized their CarePath with their own health history and sleep apnea surveys, scheduling and care plan content (delivered via “CareCards”). 

    Patient Journey 

    PATIENT CREATES CARECIRCLE ON WELLBEDuring the initial visit to the surgeon’s office, patient Patty is given information about Wellbe, a personalized care plan for her pre-and post-surgical journey. She signs up with the Nurse Navigator and receives a Welcome email. Patty shares this information and invites her family ‘Care Partner’ to join her CareCircle to access her resources.
     
    Pre- Surgery: Beginning 4-6 weeks prior to surgery, Patty views a care plan with a personalized set of “CareCards” explaining the operation and process to successfully prepare including preadmissions testing and health clearance forms. She receives a “CareCard” introduction to her Nurse Navigator. Every CareCard is delivered “from” her doctor or another member of her care team to motivate compliance. Patty receives reminder messages and checklist items leading up to the surgery and can refer to any completed CareCards in the “library” such as “How to prepare for the day of surgery.”  

    “Our patients really like the library feature. Before we launched the Wellbe platform, patients were given a Joint Replacement booklet. Now patients and families have all the surgery information at their fingertips.  Patients traveling to our Institute can prepare for their surgery by viewing videos instead of attending an in-person class,” adds Gillespie.  

    Post –Surgery: Within Wellbe, Patty views discharge information such as symptoms to watch for and completes surveys so that her care team can manage her recovery. Patty’s Nurse Navigator monitors her “Progress Report” with required actions and contacts her with any concerns. 

    “We believe this post-surgery engagement is important to prevent readmissions by ensuring the patient understands how to take medications, manage pain and follow outpatient physical therapy,” Gillespie shares.
     
    Patient Engagement Results

    Since launching the Wellbe platform in December 2015, Virtua JRI has enrolled 700 patients.  Patients span every socio-economic level and range from 40- 90 years old, with the majority in their 70s. 

    “We are signing up 86% of our surgery patients which is much higher than we expected. The remaining patients either did not have an email address or didn’t have a friend or family member to help them,” explains Gillespie.
     
    Virtua is evaluating success based on a few factors. Through a Wellbe survey, they are measuring how prepared the patient feels using the platform. With Wellbe reporting, Virtua is also measuring the patient’s engagement and compliance with required CareCards.

    Patients have shared positive comments about their experience using the tool - “grateful for the support received”. Nurse Navigators have also provided feedback - the Wellbe platform has helped them be more efficient in their patient care. Through “one tool”, nurses are able to “organize and track patient progress and communicate with the rest of the team” (i.e. physician office, pre-admission testing department). 

    Virtua has received suggested enhancements such as “defining an end time for a patient to be on the platform” and removing the medication form since patients “already gave the medication list to my surgeon.” Virtua has also added a link to the “Virtua Orthopedic Endowment”, giving patients an opportunity to give back. 

    Future Opportunities 

    Virtua initially launched the Wellbe platform without tying it into their Electronic Medical Record. “We are considering integrating Wellbe into our EMR so that the patient’s surgical chart will be easily available on one site for our Nurse Navigator.”   

    “Wellbe provides a key to patient engagement by keeping them engaged and participating towards a successful surgical journey. Virtua is determining where we can use this tool in other service lines such as Spine, Bariatric, Oncology and Maternity, which are all education-intensive clinical episodes.” 

    “This program aligns with our vision in keeping our focus on the patient /family experience, and provides us with an opportunities to participate in their surgical journey”, Gillespie concludes.  

     

    Carolinas HealthCare’s Diabetes Patients Collaborate with Coaches Using Data from Smartphones and Devices

    Carolinas Healthcare System, the second largest public, not-for-profit healthcare system in the U.S. (39 hospitals, 900 care locations) based in the Southeast, is committed to using technology to engage patients for better care. Last Fall, Carolinas HealthCare launched their Virtual Visit initiative to bring convenience to patients. Like other innovative healthcare systems, Carolinas HealthCare also launched a mobile app for patients to access their portal (MyCarolinas), inform about the closest urgent care location with wait times as well as offer a provider search.

     “This was just the beginning,” explains  Pamela Landis, AVP Information Services at Carolinas HealthCare System. “We wanted to go beyond supporting patients when they needed care to becoming part of our patients’ every day health.” 

     Based on the market trends showing consumer’s increasing use of both mobile and social media, Carolinas HealthCare System decided to invest in technology to provide ongoing information and support. While conducting marketing research, Carolinas HealthCare learned about consumers use of different wearables and tools to track activity, fitness, nutrition, sleep and health issues and heard about their frustrations having  information housed into various apps. For instance, a person could be tracking their activity in Runkeeper and using a Bluetooth-enabled scale and blood pressure cuff. All that data is being stored in separate apps.

     “We wanted to address their needs, giving them a holistic view of their health by bringing together information from all of their trackers. We leverage the health kits from the major smartphone platforms for the information aggregation,” shares Landis.

     “The first app, Carolinas Tracker, available in both the Apple and Android stores, enables consumers in the community to aggregate their health data from apps and devices into one place and view a dashboard to see where they need to focus their attention (i.e. be more active and manage their health conditions).” Carolinas Tracker gives people an easy way to track their health and provides clinical context around how they are doing. Consumers can not only see how many steps they have done through their Fitbit data but also whether that is enough to reach their goals through their Carolinas Tracker dashboard.

    The second app, MyCarolinas Tracker for Carolinas patients, will enable patients to bring together the same tracking information as the consumer app but will also integrate with their lab data in their patient portal. This patient app will also have goal setting capabilities and enable some patients to collaborate with their health coaches.

    New Tool for Diabetes Patient & Coach Care Collaboration

    Carolinas HealthCare System is planning a program to provide this new mobile app to diabetes patients, given the size of the diabetes patient population at Carolinas (90k patients), significant rise in Type 2 diabetics, the impact on other diseases and long term impact on a patient’s health.  

    “We are envisioning an ongoing program (i.e. not a pilot) and want to learn from the early adopters. We plan to invite patients through their physician practice and through our coaching program,” Landis adds. 

    Success Measures for Diabetes Coaching App Program

    After launching the Diabetes program, Carolinas HealthCare System will look at “adoption metrics” since this type of technology is still in the early stage of use in the market. With many health apps today downloaded and not used, Carolinas HealthCare is interested in seeing app usage such as when and how the app is being used.

    “We want to see if patients will integrate the app into their life to live better by taking ownership of their health,” explains Landis.

    Carolinas HealthCare is planning to collect qualitative feedback from consumers and patients  through surveys and focus groups to see if/how the app has helped the patient better understand their health and whether it has made the patient feel more in charge of their health.

    “We are very interested to hear about the patient’s motivation to use the app and understand triggers, actions and rewards. We want to explore social influence. For example, do the social capabilities with family/friends/care circle help the patient stay more engaged and does this make her more motivated to use the app?  Carolinas Healthcare will also look at hard core usage stats – usage/how often,” Landis explains.  

    "When thoughtfully designed and deployed, technology can enhance the relationship of patients with their health and their healthcare team. The solutions we are building will promote empowered patients and collaborative care delivery," explains Dr. Gregory Weidner, an internist at Carolinas Healthcare System in Charlotte, N.C. . Dr. Weidner is also the medical director for Primary Care Innovation and Proactive Health and brings vision and leadership to ambulatory care redesign and digital patient engagement initiatives.